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Basic Benefits & Coverage

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Keep Young Adults Covered on Parents' Plans Until Age 26
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Under the Affordable Care Act, if a parents' health insurance plan covers dependents, those dependents usually can be added to their parents' plan and stay on it until they turn 26 (some plans and states have different rules). Learn More
Select whether or not you would like to include health coverage for dependents under age 26 on their parents' plan in your bill.
Allow Free Market for Prescriptions
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Current law sets barriers against overseas drug providers entering the American market.

It has been proposed that drug providers should be allowed to enter the free market, which could lower drug costs and give consumers more options and access to imported drugs from overseas.

Pharmaceutical companies are concerned this could reduce their profits, which could negatively affect their research and development.  Learn More
Select whether or not you would like a free market for overseas drug providers.
Charge Same Premiums for Women and Men
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The Affordable Care Act requires that women and men be charged the same premiums for health insurance. Previously, women were often charged more than men because they were considered a higher risk due to pregnancy and higher healthcare usage.  Learn More
Select whether or not insurance companies should continue to be required to charge women the same as men.
Essential Health Benefits
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The Affordable Care Act (ACA) established a minimum amount of coverage for 10 benefit categories. Other common types of insurance, such as car or home insurance, also include a standard type of minimum coverage.

The ACA's purpose of essential benefits is to ensure higher quality coverage in health plans (which helps minimize the chance of having a surprising gap in coverage).

Critics claim that having minimum essential coverage drives up premium costs for some people who would be OK with having lesser coverage.  Learn More
Select which services you would like included in minimum health coverage. You may choose all, some, or none.
Prescription drugs
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Pediatric services (i.e., dental, vision, vaccinations)
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Pregnancy, maternity, and newborn care
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Transportation to emergency room
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Hospitalization
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Ambulatory patient services
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Preventive/wellness and chronic disease management
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Mental health and addiction services
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Laboratory services
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Rehabilitative and habilitative services and devices
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Keep Ban on Lifetime Coverage Limits
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Under the Affordable Care Act, insurance companies can’t set a dollar limit on what they spend on essential health benefits for your care during the entire time you’re enrolled in that plan.

This ban on lifetime coverage limits relieves health insurance plan beneficiaries from potentially having to fund some essential health benefits out of pocket once they reach a certain limit.

This loss of money could cause health insurance companies to charge more for premiums. Learn More
Select whether or not you would like to keep the ban on lifetime coverage limits in your bill.
Health Savings Accounts
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Some policymakers are seeking to expand the scope of health savings accounts (HSAs), which are medical savings accounts that are used to pay for out-of-pocket medical expenses.

Proposed expansions include a one-time matching $1,000 tax credit, raising the annual contribution limit (currently at $3,350 for individuals and $6,750 for families), allowing HSAs to be used with any type of health plan, allowing HSAs to pay for health insurance premiums, and allowing HSAs to be exempt from bankruptcy proceedings.

Currently, HSAs are only available to people who are enrolled in high deductible health plans. Individuals can choose to invest the money in their HSAs and grow them tax-free. Money placed into an HSA cannot be taken out for nonqualified medical expenses without having to pay penalties.

The owner of the HSA can withdraw any money from an HSA without penalty after he or she turns 65. However, any money withdrawn after this point would be taxed as income. Learn More
Select which expansions you would like to include for health savings accounts (HSAs). You may choose all, some, or none.
Include a one-time matching $1,000 tax credit
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Raise the annual contribution limit
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Allow HSAs to be used with any type of health plan
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Allow HSAs to pay for health insurance premiums
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Allow HSAs to be exempt from bankruptcy proceedings
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Medicaid Expansions
The Affordable Care Act created the opportunity for states to expand Medicaid to cover nearly all low-income Americans under age 65.

Thirty-one states and Washington, DC, have agreed to follow the ACA's Medicaid expansion. Nineteen states have not agreed to expand Medicaid.

From January 2014 to June 2015, states that chose to expand Medicaid got $79 billion in federal funding to cover people who were not eligible for Medicaid coverage before the expansion. About 11 million people became eligible for Medicaid in 2015 because of state expansions.

One healthcare reform proposal would change the current funding to block grants, which would give each state the same fixed amount to fund their Medicaid expansions regardless of how many people are covered by Medicaid or the cost of their care.

Another proposal seeks to repeal the ACA's funding of Medicaid expansions. Currently, expansion states receive at least 90% funding, which varies based on the cost in each state. Repealing the expansion funding would mean saving billions in federal funding, but it also would mean a significant increase in the uninsured population.  Learn More
Select one of the options below.

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